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. longtime friend of the clintons, no reference to democrat or democratic party in a state that is increasingly republican. i do not think any state has turned so sharply republican in recent times as arkansas, unless maybe west virginia for some of the same reasons. that ad was heavily criticized by democratic media advertising specialists, privately, not publicly. sophisticates perhaps are turned r said.what pryo you have to remember the arkansas electorate. in recent elections in the white evangelical christians have been close to 60% of the turnout. actually of appeal can make a difference. it is an emotional appeal but in heor's sense reveals what considers to be important or tries to sell that idea. up, aone poll has him long way between now and november. we will cover all the campaigns on the c-span network. steve from austin, texas, good morning. caller: good morning, thank you. rayburn,sk you, sam years ago, when he retired from sticker of the house he only had a few thousand dollars in his checking account. these guys are retiring as millionaires. are these guys a
seized by another country. would moscow show restraint week after week. how would president clinton responded parts of this country were seized to request to remove his army from those parts of the country. there is some irony in russian demand given the manner in which it would deal with separatism within its borders. it has been 63 days since russia began its campaign to annex crimea. the ukrainian government has chosen peace day after day. russia, day after day, has chosen to pursue more territory. consider the following facts. it stopped almost all train movements. that is an illegal act. it is an illegal act. for russian activists beat up to journalists near the administration building. we can go on and on about the illegal acts. 32 buildings are under occupation. we have seen dozens of officials legally detained. and the group of eight monitors objected in direct defiance. alongside all this action, we have heard the russian federation building its case for intervention. we were not even part in the ukraine in the good old days. invoking article 51 and self-defense as activate
today in moscow and also here in the u.s., we seem to be falling behind. during the first clinton administration, i recall that we had a bit of a debate. would it make sense to invite nato and russia to become over time a member of nato? recall, 12-13 years ago around 2001, that question was raised again. obviously the russian's response was we are not interested in being a member of nato, we are interested in the change a relationship. russia went further and came back to us more recently with a whole new concept for the relationship between the west and russia for european security. some of the ideas that were put forward by medvedev during his tenure as president of russia simply in our you were not acceptable to all in the west. it was just not going to work. i think to finish, we have thehed the point where ukrainian crisis, we will need to take a sharp look again at how we can over time construct a european order, a european security document that is good for us and also ok for russia. ahead, wase jump there a feeling that the west was taking advantage of russia at a time of
basder to nigeria and served during the clinton whitehouse. we have a distinguished panel. i will turn to the our guest. >> thank you for the chance to testify on behalf of catholic services. i am scott campbell the region director covering the seven african countries. we are present in about 100 countries around the world and providing assistance and development programming. we have been in c.a.r. and our work is funded by the use government and sierra's private fund. i was in cer for three weeks in march and before that in january. i met my colleague rose during the second visit. i would like to share a few ideas about what has transpired in the country and how we are prioritizeing the work. crs is present from the whole breath of the country from the southeast and in the lar affected areas. and we have a very important u.s. aid funded program there working communities affected by the lord's resistance army. we are present in the capital with our partners in the south provinces and in the northwest as well. during my most recent trip i was in the northwest part and saw the refugees
was being turned into a massive killing field the world stood idly by. both president clinton and ewan chief kofi annan had information that could have prevented or at least mitigated the rwanda genocide but chose indifference that enable the slaughter of unprecedented proportion. i herald a series of hearings, three, on rwanda and what are the people who we had information in hand. the general was there on the ground willing to take action to curtail what turned out to be upwards of 1 million people who were slaughtered and with that information, again i could've been prevented or at least largely mitigated. when the blood stopped flowing the word looked at the corpse piled high and shocked. never again was the phrase of egeland lives. it is happening again. our witnesses know and they will bear witness today. the question before us today is whether the phrase never again is one we sober used to pay lip service while nothing being done or not enough and whether not we're going to act. we do have to distinguish witnesses from state today and as i mentioned that's assistance secretary jackson
,rt with the oldced -- with the old ced plan, going back to clinton care, there is a lot of good stuff in the bill. let's build on that and a lot of bad stuff has been taken out, like the class act, more good news you never heard about. it has already been removed by the administration. sot people enjoy hating much. so, give credit where credit is due, and let's add a malpractice case to this bill. republicans are afraid to do that even though we could save tens of billions of dollars because they do not want the stigma of being associated with this bill. >> congressman? >> i could not disagree more. liability reform is something the republican house has been after for years. the missing link in the affordable care act was fixing tr, the liability system, and letting doctors talk to each other. >> where is the burgess bill on malpractice reform? >> i am glad you asked. >> that is not a bill, that is a book. >> you know this because you are a doctor, but here is the you heardl question, from the last panel repeal is not a viable alternative. millions of people have written contracts based on an exi
allies made a good faith effort to convince russia the security was converging. president clinton said the test of russia's measure is whether russia, the big neighbor, can be the good neighbor. despite the reservations of many new members, nato established the partnership for peace and negotiated the russia-nato piece agreement and some went so far to see that russia might join the alliance. but we were never blinded to the risk. former secretary of state warned in 1995 that among his words, one of the plans of preparing is that russia will abandoned behavior that characters history particularly during the soviet period. and nato must stand ready to visit the basic principles underlying its relationship with russia. nato enlargement didn't invite russian aggression. it didn't form crisis then or now. instead it settled old disputes and promoted freedom and free mact markets and advanced the cause of peace. that is why nato holds the door open for aspiring members. consider the alternative, a world without nato enlargement and not the asurances they provide. it would have risked a prec
effort president clinton put into successful implementation of the north american free trade agreement. and i'm sure you can also recall president bush's total political commitment to renewing tpa back in 2002. in those cases war rooms were established and each cabinet secretary made congressional approval of those initiatives a public priority. put simply, we are not seeing that level of commitment from president obama which is disappointing to me and, i think, a lot of others as well. and without more effort on the part of the administration, i just don't think we can succeed. in addition, i am concerned about the president's enforcement record. e do spite a myriad of clear -- despite a myriad of clear violations, we have yet to see a single case brought against russia in the world trade organization. this is the case despite the fact that the administration told congress during consideration of pntr that one of the major benefits of having russia in the wto would be our ability to bring hem to dispute -- bring them to dispute settlement. i'm also disappointed that the president refu
to restore the solvensy of social security in 1983 up to the balanced budgets of the clinton administration. president obama has put the right american in charge. we welcome you before our committee today. i wanted to focus in two areas in this round. first of all, in the housing sector where our secondary market is in a bit of a jam at this point. we know that wall street's terrible mortgage securitization record created the largest transfer of capital from main street to wall street in our history. african-americans lost all their accumulated equity since world war ii. hispanic americans similarly, working class people across this country. i represent communities terribly impacted by the securitization meltdown. my question is, what is treasury doing to perhaps working with the justice department to recoup some of those assets for these hard-working americans in communities that have been so devastated? and have you considered, in addition to bringing back -- by the way, those banks are doing very well, the major ones that were a part of this. everybody seems to be fine up there. but have
clinton speak thatsecretary panetta night? >> there was a lot of coordination between the state department and defense about response to this. and of course there's a military chain of command about how assets get deployed and there are military decisions made help.which assets can believe me, again, the committee was getting at was a notion that we at the state department did not do everything we could, including coordinating with our military colleagues about a possible response. notion is just not true. it has been repeatedly batted the senate committee on intelligence, by other committees, bipartisan have held who multiple hearings including the house articled services committee. so i'll appreciate this committee's attempt to continue talking about this issue, really werenotion that they pushing today has been repeatedly proven false. tobut it's not an attempt keep talking about it, they are still talking about it. focusing on how to embassy security and -- >> this retired brigadier general who testified this thisng has not spoken to before, before that committee. which youiewpoint jus
, it was an attack. >> jones at the state department, and an e-mail that went to others, hillary clinton's chief of staff says she told the libyan ambassador september 12, 12:46 p.m., i told him the group that conducted the attack is affiliated with islamic extremists. would you agree or disagree with that statement? >> yes i would agree. the timing of it, i do not know. the content, yes. >> the scandal that is here, that some choose to ignore, a phony scandal, is the fact that the cia station chief, the military themselves. you have the person sitting front of us, who is the head of intelligence and he is looking at the intelligence. they come to the conclusion that it is austria -- sharia and then you have the state telling libyans. none of them think it is a video. none of them. the military, the cia, the cia station chief, the state department, all of them, the fact that the time, mr. chairman, the facts do not point to a video. that only comes from the white house. what was going on in the room, general? i were people were under attack and people were dying. what is the military doing? >> -
that country was turned into a massive killing field the world stood by with clinton in the peacekeeping chief had actionable intelligence information that could have mitigated the genocide. also holding a series of meetings or hearings we heard from people who said we had the information on hand. he was there wanted to take effective action that was of course, of 1 million people who were slaughtered in and with that information it could have been prevented or largely mitigated. the and the overall book to the corpses piled high and was shocked. ladies and gentlemen, it is happening again as our witnesses know and bear witness to the question is if the phrase never again is one that we use a and whether or not we have two distinguished witnesses and also and richards assistant secretary for population refugee and migration. while sending two people to justify is encouraging it shows the issue but the question i will ask them is whether redoing? but are we doing enough? in 2012 the administration created the atrocity provincial board following a study that said preventing mass atrocities is a
the secretary of state call up stuttgart and say "deploy some assets" or does she -- didn't secretary clinton speak with secretary panetta that night and general dempsey? >> there was a lot of coordination between the state department and the defense department about response to this. and, of course, there's a military chain of command about how assets get deployed and there are military decisions made about which assets make sense and can help to be deployed. believe me, again, what you -- the committee was getting at was a notion that we at the state department did not do everything we could, including coordinating with our military colleagues about a possible response. that notion is just not true. it has been repeatedly batted down by the senate select committee on intelligence, by other committees, bipartisan committees, who have held multiple hearings, including the house armed services committee. so while i appreciate this committee's attempt to continue talking about this issue, really this notion that they were pushing today has been repeatedly proven false. >> well, but it's not an
we could have done more. >> secretary hilary clinton whispered into the air that it was the video that had done this. is that true? when did you think it was over? when were americans out of harm's way? when were they safe? >> they are still not safe today. >> when did you think the fight was over? >> we are still there. that night, september 12th, we still had people in benghazi, when was the fight over? >> when the people from benghazi finley made their way pack and were extracted back to tripoli. >> you can watch the rest of the hearing on c-span when it is getting underway. and join the conversation on facebook where we are asking has benghazi been fully invested. a new pentagon report found sexual assaults in the military rose 25% between 2012-2013. defense secretary chuck hagel discussed the report and he is joined by officials from the defense department sexual assault prevention and response office. this is 45 minutes. >> good afternoon. happy may day. last week, as i think many of you know, i visited dod's safe helpline for survivors of sexual assault. and i saw, when i w
is affiliated with islamic extremists. this coming from the state department, cheryl mills, secretary clinton posses chief of staff. i live -- i would like to enter this into the record. >> what was the date and time? >> september 12, 2012, hours after the attack. it is what the state department told the libyan government what was happening. "i told the libyan ambassador that the group attacks are affiliated with islamic extremists. those were the facts as the state department knew them. >> without objection, so ordered. copies will be distributed. we now welcome our guest and witnesses. general robert lovell is the former deputy director for intelligence and knowledge development director at the united states african command. and the former deputy command general of the joint task force. and a research fellow at the hoover institution. mr. david ross, phd, is a senior fellow at the foundation for defense of democracies. mr. frederick is a senior associate for middle east program at the carnegie endowment for international peace. your title is impressive but they're all doctorates. pursuant t
of the gun, or sitting around waiting for the state department and hillary clinton to call them up and say, do something? what did they actually do? >> we sent the predator drone overhead to -- >> did we do enough, general? >> sir, you're a professional -- you're retired. i know you care deeply about this. what was the mood in the room, the feeling? was it to save our people? >> it was desperation to be able to -- >> what? >> desperation there to gain situational awareness and to be able to do something to save people. >> did they actually do it? did they actually do it? three actions we talk about, a fast team is not even trained to engage in a fight. the other force is coming from the united states of america. we had assets there in europe. did they actually good to the sound of the gun? did they actually go into benghazi? >> no, sir, they did not. >> why not? >> basically, there was a lot of looking to the state department for what they wanted, and in deference to the libyan people and the sense of deference to the desires of the state department in terms of what they would like to have
? >> i'm sure we could have done more. >> secretary of hillary clinton whispered, evidently, according to one of the mothers, whispered in the ear said, "it was the video that had done this." is that true? >> absolutely not, sir. >> when did you think it was over? when were our americans in harms way? when were they safe? >> they are still not safe today, sir. >> when did you think the fight was over? >> we are still there. >> that night, though, september 12, while we still had people in benghazi, when was the fight over? >> when the people from benghazi finally made their way back and were extracted back to tripoli. >> your opinion, your vantage point -- they're in libya, was al qaeda on the run? >> no, sir. >> what was going on with al qaeda, september 11, september 12 in the months leading up to that? were they on the run? >> no, sir. there were actually affiliates and islamist extremists our responsible for the perpetration of these attacks. >> were they growing in strength, shrinking and strength? >> my estimation would be that they were growing in strength. in number and in capa
satellite corp. 2013] on c-span, former president bill clinton speaks at georgetown university. then, "washington journal." followed by live coverage of the u.s. house. everybody says, how do you think these women came from such a very low rent part? the victorian era is so stratified. rich and the real -- thebaron achievers life and times of these women was in the most buccaneer times, after the civil war. we had rockefeller. the robber barons making a lot of money. i think it was easy for them because they had been running around with low rent con artists , now let's go with the big boys. they were beautiful and they were tough and they were driven. they were driven for power and individualism, but they could have been courtesans, they could have kept in a fine manner if they wanted. they pushed for their and dependence and women's independence. -- independents and women's independence. two little remembered victorian sisters changed the course of american women's rights and american history. sunday on q&a. itself is not unusual. similar streets have popped up in other cities. beau
. in 1996, a republican-controlled congress enacted a 21% minimum wage increase, which president clinton signed into law, and most recently, in 2007, president george w. bush signed a 41% increase into law. you can see on this chart, madam president -- and i sigh to my friend from louisiana, i'm winding up. you can see on this chart, madam president, all the different times that the minimum wage has been raised and by how much. if you look at the ten different times we've increased the minimum wage, the average increase has been about 41%. this increase increases it by 39%. that's below average. that's below average, but you hear -- to hear some people talk, you would think this bill is an unprecedented assault on american capitalism. tom delay described the minimum wage earlier this year as unconstitutional. others say it doesn't affect a lot of workers. the speaker several years ago before he was speaker said he would -- quote -- commit suicide before he voted on a clean minimum wage bill. this makes no sense. it is at war with our history. i see that my colleagues are here. i ask and
-- what i'm seing from where i'm sitting, what i read, is the lone superpower that bill clinton talked about that america could no longer afford to be, becoming weaker, everybody else is becoming emboldened. i see people flexing their muscles buzz of our weakness and lack of resolve that we have. where do you think this will lead? where do you think russia will end up? will they go into other areas? where there's a large russian-speaking population. do either of you see that? >> we see that there's a risk and the russians have influence in those areas but it is our policy to exact a coast -- a cost from the russians for their behavior that's in violation of international norms. >> and do you feel the sanction this is a we are talking about, that we've done, do you think they'll have any impact on russian's agrecian? >> sir, the purpose of sanctions is to try to influence russian behavior, it's meant to bring it back within international norms. >> how is that working so far? ms. friedt? >> i couldn't -- >> if i may, sir. this could be a long process, sir. >> but again, do we have compli
increase in minimum wage. president clinton's economic advisor gene sperling, who just left this administration, the obama administration, back in 1998 wrote a memo to president cline continue when a similar -- president clinton when a similar proposal was being made. now the harkin bill that we're going to vet on shortly proposes to raise the minimum wage 40%. this was back in 1978 gene sperling writing to president clington on a proposed increase of the minimum wage by 41%. the same sort of proposal. so this is what mr. sperling wrote: "your entire economic team believes that this approach is too aggressive and are concerned that senator kennedy's proposal" -- it was senator teddy kennedy's proposal back in 1978 -- "could approve damaging to the employment prospects of low-skilled workers." again, that's whatd c.b.o., the congressional budget office said about this bill. he goes on to say "as well as to the general macroeconomic performance of the economy." so what are our friends across the aisle proposing we do when the economy grew at .1% this last quarter? well, to adm
roth. we were so passionate about it, madeleine may remember, that president clinton joked that ato must be offering to move the headquarters to wilmington, delaware -- because -- no, i'm serious. it was -- do you remember that's what he said at the time of the official vote. but you know, all these years later, there are some who look at russia's aggression in ukraine and say -- maybe we should not have extended security guarantees to poland, romania, bulgaria and the baltic states. but i think it shows we had to extend that guarantee, because we reject and continue to reject, have rejected the notion of a sphere of influence built on the backs of the people who deserve freedom -- freedom that we always supported and that we believe is as vital today as it was then. and let's be clear -- the current crisis born in the enlargment of nato and the eu 15 yeras ago has nothing to do with -- 15 years ago has nothing to do with the enlargement of nato. it was born in the kremlin. it was born in putin's mind. t has nothing to do with the fact that we expanded nato. and here's another debat
, for which i might say i was made a lot of fun of when i took office. why is bill clinton spending all this time on the farm program? a presidenthat does. but this is really, really important. anduse it affects people, it determines whether your purpose can be advanced. , i just picked three policies. to talk about americorps and student service because this is the 20th anniversary of it, but i think its impact, its return on taxpayer dollars and the number people it mobilizes, the fact that we have had far more people serve -- we had more people serve in americorps in the first five years than in the history of the peace corps. the main thing that frustrated peoplethat until actually needed them, a lot of people didn't know much about the americorps programs. but i decided not to do that. i wanted to talk about three policies today that i discussed in the first talk a year ago. the implementation of our economic strategy in 1993, anchored by the budget. , whichfare reform bill was highly controversial at the time, and remains so, and our efforts to achieve a comprehensive peace in the
the so-called labor participation rate. so what did president clinton do when his economic advisers said don't do it, mr. president? perhaps it is good politics, it will hurt the economy and it will put people out of work. and president clinton, to his credit decided not to pursue that particular 41% increase in minimum wage. but i mention that is a sad contrast with the current situation. president obama, seeing his favorability ratings of the lowest they have been since he became president is trying to change the object. we all know that a massive minimum wage increase can be a job killer. and they want to ignore the congressional budget report. and they want us to believe that they will have little or no effect and maybe would have a positive effect and this includes america's businesses being no better and they started washing dishes and they started at the bottom and work their way up because they could find a job and they could get their hand on the first rung of the economic ladder. and they understand how businesses work and they understand the negative consequences of this bad p
on facebook and twitter. tonight, former president bill clinton speaks at georgetown university. vice president biden talks about and ukraine. then senator bob corker on ukraine. a house hearing on exporting natural gas to europe. >> on the next "washington ofrnal," the effotrts republicans to have federal lands transferred to state control. and a discussion of the economy and job creation. live at 7 a.m. eastern. share your thoughts on the program by calling in and your comments on facebook and footer. -- twitter. >> there's a lot more trauma and people's lives, a lot more disconnection, a lot more families are broken that should not be broken. i am not talking about the worst terrible means. families that cannot hold because of the stress of life, not holding a job, living in class,rld, that working up-and-down world can put a lot of strain on people, that connection they should have. and even the addictions that are so rampant now because it is so easy to get drugs and alcohol. it was happening for years ago but not like today. -- this is more of the american story than people are
% proposed increase in minimum wage. president clinton's economic adviser gene spurling had just left this administration the obama administration back in 1998 wrote a memo to president clinton on a similar proposal being made to raise the minimum wage at that time 41% so now the harkin bill that we are going to vote on here shortly proposes to raise the minimum wage 40%. so this is back in 1998. james burling writing to president clinton on a proposed increase of the minimum wage by 41%. so for all practical purposes the same sort of proposal. so this is what mr. spurling wrote to president clinton. he said your entire economic team believes that this approach is too aggressive and our concern that senator kennedy's proposal and senator teddy kennedy's proposal back in 98 could prove damaging to the employment prospects of low-skilled workers. again, that is what the congressional budget office has said about this bill. and he goes on to say as well as to the general macroeconomic performance of the economy. so what are our friends across the aisle proposing we do when the economy gr
read -- this morning by reading an excerpt from a memo by gene sperling to president clinton t relates it a minimum wage proposal similar to the one we're considering today. here's what he wrote: "your entire economic team believes that this approach is too aggressive and are concerned that it could approve damaging to employment prospects of low-skilled workers, as well as to the general microeconomic performance of our economy." bue memo noted there was a plus side to supporting the proposal. it would unify the liberal wing of the democratic party. well, today feels like deja vu all over again because even though our constituents keep telling us that they expect washington to focus on jobs, that's clearly not what they're getting from the senate. instead senate democrats are pushing legislation today that would cost as many as a million jobs in this country, legislation that the left flank of their party demands. that's their response to the pleas of our constituents to do something about jobs. the proposal that nonpartisan analysts tells us could cost jobs. these are the same washin
.w. bush, george w. bush, supported the mission of the ex-im bank, as did bill clinton. all these presidents were staunch supporters of capitalism and the ex-im bank. listen to what president reagan said when he signed re-authorization, a bill that was re-authorized almost unanimously in 1986. quote, this sends an important signal to both our exporting community and foreign suppliers, that american exporters will continue to be able to compete vigorously for business throughout the world. perhaps an even more conservative voice, former vice president cheney said, in 1997, some of my fellow conservatives on the hill may have a philosophical problem about the fact that the bank -- with the -- problem with the fact that the bank is a government agency. but if they consider the success of its lending programs, it would be difficult for them to object on budgetary grounds. for every $1 put into the ex-im, there's been a $20 return to the u.s. economy. and further, again, same speech, vice president cheney, ex-im bank is remarkably effective at helping create jobs, opportunities f
clinton said a decision would come before the end of 2011. in march, 2013, president clinton told all of the senate republicans in our caucus where he was invited to come and visit with us about anything he wanted to talk about, one of the questions that came up, that a decision would be made on this pipeline would be made before the end of 2013. that was 13 months ago. and yet, no decision. so as has been stated by my colleagues on good friday afternoon of this year, the state department announced an indefinite delay in the comment period on the pipeline project. so it appears unlikely that president obama will make a decision any time in the near future, if ever. this indefinite delay is mind-boggling, considering all the advantages of this pipeline. granting the permit for the pipeline will create thousands of jobs directly and indirectly. it will provide more than 800,000 barrels of canadian oil daily from a friendly economic partner. rejection of the pipeline permit will not affect canada's decision to develop these oil resources, because, you know, they are smarter than we are.
that it was president clinton who 20 years ago called for the elimination of antipersonnel mines. two years later, in 1996, back in the last century, he said -- quote -- "today i'm launching an international effort to ban antipersonnel land mines." but that administration did not sign the treaty. then we had the bush administration. they did nothing on the issue. they did not sign the treaty. now we have the obama administration. nothing has changed. the obama administration is following the bush administration's policy of doing nothing on the treaty. so we're still waiting. i was thinking of this this weekend because last week i was in vietnam along with senator shelby and crapo and representatives cooper from tennessee and well -- welch from vermont. we had conversations with president sang, the minister of defense and other officials. we met with organizations, those who worked to locate and clear land mines. it is costly. it is dangerous work. they have been doing it for decades. until you visit the sites where they do this, you can't fully understand because it is slow, hard, dangerous work.
on u.s. policy in the region. he served under secretary of state clinton as deputy assistant secretary of state, where she was central to organizing the u.s. government's response to the arab spring's. she is the author of -- and editor of "how israelis and palestinians negotiate, a cross troll analysis of the peace process." robert is the director of -- at the washington institute. an expert on arab and islamic apologists as well as u.s. middle east policy, he has written and spoken widely on the arab israeli peace process, and the need to revamp u.s. public diplomacy in the middle east. he is the author and editor of numerous books, including the battle of ideas on the war on terror. elliott abrams, senior federal for middle eastern studies -- senior fellow for middle eastern studies. he held several important positions, including deputy assistant to the president and deputy national security adviser where he supervised u.s. policy in the middle east. he was also an assistant secretary of state in the reagan administration and was the author of four books, including undue process, se
in another state, chelsea clinton is doing an event and tells people that she is pregnant. and then people are buzzing, what does this mean for 2016? probably nothing, but it means that people are already looking ahead. that is a problem exercising power abroad. it is a challenge that he needs to look at ahead. guest: it is a challenge being named a lame duck, so early in the second term, but the truth is he has not been able to get much done in congress. if power shifts to republicans in the senate, he does not have that one chamber to wooster his priorities, so it will be very interesting, as we said before, to see how the white house works y completelyiall control republican congress. i read earlier that he may start to worry too much and give away the store, the issues that they care about. hard to predict at this point, but definitely tricky for the white house, in that they still have two and a half years of governing and they are not able to get much of his agenda done. guest: and the republicans know this. if you have watched the nba playoffs, the team that is ahead and takes the b
of the savon center for mideast policy at the brookings institution served under secretary of state clinton as deputy assistant secretary of state for near east where she was central to organizing the u.s. government's response to the arab spring. freedom isauthor of on the march, and editor of how palestinians -- and palestinians negotiate very robert sattler is executive director of the washington holds theand also howard p burke or chair in u.s.-middle east policy. an expert on arab and islamic politics as well as u.s. middle has policy, dr. sattler written and spoken widely on the , and the needeace to revamp u.s. public diplomacy in the middle east. he is the author and editor of numerous books and monographs, including the battle of ideas in the war on terror, essays on u.s. public diplomacy in the middle east. fellow abrams, senior for middle eastern studies served in the george w. bush white house in several important deputyns, including national security advisor. he supervised u.s. policy in the middle east. he was also an assistant secretary of state in the reagan administration a
as secretary of the department of agriculture in the clinton administration and 18 years in congress, but most importantly he was the former director of the institute of policy. he had my job. golden served as director of the office of management and budget. andy card also was chief of staff in bw bush administration -- in the george w. bush administration including the beginning of 9/11. senate majority leader trent lott is the cochair on the committee for political reform. he was a senator for many terms from the state of mississippi. -- jovernor johnson a new hn sununu. staff for president clinton was supposed to be here but he is ill and cannot join us. he full bios are in your program. you can google them and see this. we want to invite everyone online to join in this conversation. if you are physically here, we have a card where you can write a question and there will be people going around in the audience and will grab a question. we'll hopefully get to one or two coup of those. we will certainly get to one. you can also send an e-mail or tweet. the twitter handle is @bpc_bipartisan. eu
to be washed. and unfortunately under our previous secretary of state, hillary clinton, she gave, in my opinion unwisely, the reset button to the former soviet -- to the former russian government and apparently didn't think that they'd push the button. they did. they pushed the reset button. and they pushed it in a way that has the soviet union looking at the united states and making the calculation that the united states is now a weak power, that we have weakened rselves and therefore now is russia's opportune time to seek to influence and pull back into the fold former soviet block nations. as we've learned from history, .hen a mad man speaks, listen mad men spoke in the form of lenin and stalin and tens of millions of people were enslaved in misery for decades. the same happened under adolf hitler, with a mad man who spoke and he murdered six million jewish people. that's why we have today the holocaust remembrance day. we need to pay attention today to the thugs and rulers that are making their mad statements. they're doing it again. and that's why again, why did the obama administration de
and covered president clinton, congress, president bush. i had never really at all thought about serving inside of an administration. certainly not as a job. but as you will find, life happens and serendipity occurs. and shortly after the election in 2008, the day after, a close friend of mine who had been working on the foreign policy deal under clinton and had been working on senate foreign relations committee as a top staffer, democratic staffer, working for senator joe biden. the summer of 2008, biden is picked, they win. i am congratulating my friend the next day. that was the first time the idea was put to me about coming in. at the time i thought perhaps it would be kind of exciting and maybe something in the foreign-policy arena, but it quickly became an opportunity to be the vice president's communications director, which was obviously a huge change for me. but a fantastic opportunity and a great, great decision in part because i woke up every morning for probably six months wondering if i knew what i was doing, was cut out for the job. i think what you think as a reporter cover
.s. policies in the region. tamara cofman wittes served under secretary of state clinton, deputy assistant secretary of state for near east where she was central to organizing the u.s. government's response to the arab spring. she is the author of the freedoms unsteady march, america's role in building arab democracy, and editor of how israelis and palestinians negotiate a cross-cultural analysis of the peace process. robert sattler is the executive director of the washington institute and also holds -- robert stout off, the berkowitz chair in u.s. middle east policy. an expert on arab and islamic politics, as well as u.s. middle east policy. he has written and spoken widely on the arab-israeli peace process, the challenge of political islam and the need to revamp u.s. public diplomacy in the middle east. he is the author and editor of numerous books, including the battle of ideas in the war on terrorists, essays on u.s. public diplomacy in the middle east. elliott abrams, senior fellow for middle asian studies at the council on foreign relations, served in the george w. bush white house i
the consequences. clinton's is an indication that this is the the power point presentation. rearrested big bins lie. yet another it could kick known to. it's the of the. he should use all the to vintages available, but we should be aware of the abilities and limitations with discerning consumers of treatment g t have some ground rules. >> if you will just wait for the bulk of fun. and take the go to india's first question. you keep talking. he used to be that the diary and it comes : ending get to the more wary of the talking points of begun. >> of the great question which is part of the puffin logical big unions it. is the ability to skinner did? , to a priest told do farmers and miners of his son. often this of bonuses to abolish some to be her to an internal been. tune these. this bears. then fill it with punditry. view or those organizations is been doing real reporting. but washington and in your. >> kitchen of from martian. and then it though room here can you conant of. >> yo right. while the magazine is. others and very bad ones. as the last area where and been and kneele warriors injec
clinton and the state's. but that said his profits give him the independents to program. on issues like immigration, education, climate change, they are of the same page. he allows him to do it. >> said it will live in such a different world. peerless lotze of bestead there put money behind it the kind of whether apparatus. that is the title of your but. looking back -- i guess i have klum tea how to questions. the long term impact of our political discourse? >> as think roger ailes has brought us back to an earlier time. partisan ba going back to vh. >> it was the balance of it to the. it was a post or anomaly. arson the is here to stay. the inventors flowered with the billion different voices. the are now part of the country. that think the lasting legacy has been to belies the scorched earth zero some position of politics, a testament to his success but democrats have copied his success. bill clinton can of the moment it to about the democrats talked about how they ran a campaign. barack obama grand -- >> that was before. >> with that went back to the top of the political consultant
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